How does a water heater work?

How does a water heater work?

Water heaters exploit the heat rising principle to deliver hot water right to your faucet. The old, reliable water heater design that’s most widely used in the U.S. today is really a pretty simple appliance. Tank – The inner shell of a water heater is a heavy metal tank containing a water protective liner. Tank holds 40 to 60 gallons (151 to 227 liters) of hot water at around 50 to 100 pounds per square inch (PSI) The exterior of the tank is covered in an insulating material like polyurethane foam.

A water heater’s thermostat controls the temperature of the water inside the tank. Normally, you can set the temperature anywhere between 120 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit (49 to 82 degrees Celsius) The water temperature setting recommended by most manufacturers is between 120 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit. If there are children living in your home, it’s wise to stay closer to the lower end of the range. Setting your water heater to a lower temperature saves energy, too, and if you remember to dial back the heat when you go on vacation, you’ll experience even more energy savings.

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